OCCI 2016 Abstracts


Full Papers
Paper Nr: 1
Title:

Evolution of the Open Cloud Computing Interface

Authors:

Boris Parák, Zdeněk Šustr, Michal Kimle, Pablo Orviz Fernández, Álvaro López García, Stavros Sachtouris and Víctor Méndez Muñoz

Abstract: The OCCI standard has been in use for half a decade, with multiple server-side and client-side implementations in use across the world in heterogeneous cloud environments. The real-world experience uncovered certain peculiarities or even deficiencies which had to be addressed either with workarounds, agreements between implementers, or with updates to the standard. This article sums up implementers’ experience with the standard, evaluating its maturity and discussing in detail some of the issues arising during development and use of OCCI-compliant interfaces. It shows how particular issues were tackled at different levels, and what the motivation was for some of the most recent changes introduced in the OCCI 1.2 specification.

Paper Nr: 2
Title:

Easing Scientific Computing and Federated Management in the Cloud with OCCI

Authors:

Zdeněk Šustr, Diego Scardaci, Jiří Sitera, Boris Parák and Víctor Méndez Muñoz

Abstract: One of the benefits of OCCI stems from simplifying the life of developers aiming to integrate multiple cloud managers. It provides them with a single protocol to abstract the differences between cloud service implementations used on sites run by different providers. This comes particularly handy in federated clouds, such as the EGI Federated Cloud Platform, which bring together providers who run different cloud management platforms on their sites: most notably OpenNebula, OpenStack, or Synnefo. Thanks to the wealth of approaches and tools now available to developers of virtual resource management solutions, different paths may be chosen, ranging from a small-scale use of an existing command line client or single-user graphical interface, to libraries ready for integration with large workload management frameworks and job submission portals relied on by large science communities across Europe. From lone wolves in the long-tail of science to virtual organizations counting thousands of users, OCCI simplifies their life through standardization, unification, and simplification. Hence cloud applications based on OCCI can focus on user specifications, saving cost and reaching a robust development life-cycle. To demonstrate this, the paper shows several EGI Federated Cloud experiences, demonstrating the possible approaches and design principles.

Paper Nr: 3
Title:

SLAaaS: an OCCI Compliant Framework for Cloud SLA Provisioning and Violation Detection

Authors:

Gregory Katsaros, Thijs Metsch and John Kennedy

Abstract: SLAs are an integral part of all modern service provisioning operations. They have been a topic of discussion, research and development for many years but still the norm is the use of rigid, complex and not easy to automate Service Level Agreements. In this paper we are presenting a service framework that is leveraging the OCCI specification in order to facilitate standardized SLA provisioning and violation detection. This SLA as a Service (SLAaaS) offering is provided as an open source framework to any Service Provider that wants to efficiently enhance his infrastructure with SLA support.

Paper Nr: 6
Title:

Beyond Nagios - Design of a Cloud Monitoring System

Authors:

Augusto Ciuffoletti

Abstract: The paper describes a monitoring system specially designed for cloud infrastructures. The features that are relevant for such distributed application are -) scalability, that allows utilization in systems of thousands of nodes, -) flexibility, to be customized for a large number of applications, -) openness, to allow the coexistence of user and administration monitoring. We take as a starting point the Nagios monitoring system, that has been successfully used for Grid monitoring and is still used for clouds. We analyze its shortcomings when applied to cloud monitoring, and propose a new monitoring system, that we call Rocmon, that sums up Nagios experience with a cloud perspective. Like Nagios, Rocmon is plugin-oriented to be flexible. To be fully interoperable and long-living, it uses standard tools: the OGF OCCI for the configuration interface, the REST paradigm to take advantage of Web tools, and HTML5 WebSockets for data transfers. The design is checked with an open source Ruby implementation featuring the most relevant aspects.